Earning Credibility with the C-Suite: Execute and analyze, then improve and perform beyond expectations

[tweetmeme source= “WallopOnDemand” only_single=false]When you invest in PR measurement and analytics you have an opportunity to analyze your PR programs, find areas that need improvement and make necessary changes. Collecting measurement data allows you to look for signs that will help determine which PR initiatives are working and which ones aren’t. Then, you can focus on what works and eliminate activities that don’t in order to maximize your PR results. By constantly pushing to improve your PR, you can deliver results that will impress your executive team.

 Throughout your campaigns you want to scan your measurement data and look for clues and insights that will help you answer questions like:

 • Is our PR campaign working?

• Are we receiving coverage in our target publications?

• How favorable is the coverage?

• How prominently is our brand/company being featured in the stories?

• How often are our key messages being included, and with what interpretation?

 While these are just a few sample questions, the insights you learn by answering these and other questions can (and should) be used to make informed decisions about PR activities and strategy. Don’t be afraid to course correct in the middle of your campaign if your measurement and analysis suggests a need for change. After all, it’s much better to evaluate your progress as you go, and make changes as needed, than it is to reach the end of your campaign and realize PR wasn’t effective. Otherwise, you’ll end up having to answer tough questions from disappointed executives about PR’s lackluster performance. In fact, it’s a good idea to always keep in mind that whether your PR results are good or bad, you’re going to be held accountable. Know that you’ll have to answer to executives, and let that motivate you to perform beyond expectations.

 As you analyze your PR results, spend some time looking at your competition. You can bet that executives will want to know if they’re beating competitors or falling behind. Ask yourself how your PR outputs/outcomes compare to those of your competitors – look at executive quotes, analyst quotes, customer stories, product coverage, or other criteria that is relevant to you. Try to determine the areas where your competitors are having the most success, and then incorporate that information into your PR strategy to ultimately outperform the competition. You can gain confidence from the C-suite by showing them proof that PR is helping the company make progress towards goals and meet or beat competitors.

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One Response

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Scott Muff, Stephanie Grams. Stephanie Grams said: Is your PR campaign working? When execs ask, answer by analyzing, improving and performing beyond expectations http://dld.bz/86Az […]

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